Fernando Garcia Menendez

Assistant Professor

Dr. Fernando Garcia Menendez joined the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering as an Assistant Professor in January 2016. His research uses computational models to explore interdisciplinary questions related to air pollution, climate change, and environmental policy. He is associated with the Environmental, Water Resources, and Coastal Engineering and Computing and Systems research groups within the department.

Dr. Garcia Menendez received his Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He completed his M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Stanford University and B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Tecnológico de Monterrey (ITESM). Prior to joining NC State, he was a Postdoctoral Associate in the Center for Global Change Science and Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Garcia Menendez has also spent time working in industry and environmental advocacy.

Education

Ph.D.

Environmental Engineering

Georgia Institute of Technology

M.S.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Stanford University

B.S.

Chemical Engineering

Tecnológico de Monterrey

Research Description

Dr. Garcia Menendez’s research interests include air quality, environmental policy, and high-performance computing. His research is focused on developing computational tools based on numerical methods, uncertainty analysis, and integrated assessment modeling to simulate interactions between environmental and human systems. Current research includes efforts to simulate the effect of forest fires on atmospheric chemistry, evaluate the impacts of climate change mitigation policies on air quality, and assess uncertainty in projections of health effects associated with air pollution.

Publications

The role of natural variability in projections of climate change impacts on U.S. ozone pollution
Garcia-Menendez, F., Monier, E., & Selin, N. E. (2017), Geophysical Research Letters, 44.
U.S. Air Quality and Health Benefits from Avoided Climate Change under Greenhouse Gas
Garcia-Menendez, F., Saari, R. K., Monier, E., & Selin, N. E. (2015), Environmental Science & Technology, 49(13), 7580-7588.
Simulating smoke transport from wildland fires with a regional-scale air quality model: Sensitivity to spatiotemporal allocation of fire emissions
Garcia-Menendez, F., Hu, Y., & Odman, M.T. (2014), Science of the Total Environment, 493.
Fires and air
Odman, M. T., Hu, Y., Garcia-Menendez, F., Davis, A. Y., Chang, M. E., & Russell, A. G. (2013), EM, The Magazine for Environmental Managers, November, 1221.
Simulating smoke transport from wildland fires with a regional-scale air quality model: Sensitivity to uncertain wind fields
Garcia-Menendez, F., Hu, Y., & Odman, M.T. (2013), Journal of Geophysical Research. Atmospheres, 118, 6493-6504.
Modeling smoke plume-rise and dispersion from Southern United States prescribed burns with daysmoke
Achtemeier, G.L., Goodrick, S.A., Liu, Y., Garcia-Menendez, F., Hu, Y., & Odman, M.T. (2011), Atmosphere, 2, 358-388.
Adaptive grid use in air quality modeling.
Garcia-Menendez, F., & Odman, M.T. (2011), Atmosphere, 2, 484-509.
An adaptive grid version of CMAQ for improving the resolution of plumes.
Garcia-Menendez, F., Yano, A., Hu, Y., & Odman, M.T. (2010), Atmospheric Pollution Research, 1, 239249.

View all publications via NC State Libraries

Grants

Quantifying Adverse Impacts of Smoke Exposure from the Fall of 2016 Southeast Wildfires on North Carolina Public Health
NCSU Center for Human Health and the Environment(7/01/17 - 3/31/18)
Southern Integrated Prescribed Fire Information System for Air Quality and Health Impacts
Joint Fire Science Program(10/01/16 - 9/30/18)